Author Archives: joanannreid

About joanannreid

Coach and writer with a keen interest in book. I have my own website where I blog on career related topics www.coachassociates.co.uk

Stanley Pickard (1760-1779) – a short life

Whilst researching my ancestors on the Sarginson side of my family I came across a record which intrigued me. Stanley, my first cousin seven times removed, seems to have been apprenticed to a member of the Glover’s Livery Company in London in 1779. The Company was one of the City’s ancient Livery Companies with a Hall which had been established in Beech Lane, Cripplegate in 1638. However, by the late 18th Century the number of members in the Company had decreased and the Hall was given up as there were limited funds to maintain it. Unfortunately, there is only a transcribed record of Stanley’s apprenticeship which states that he was the son of George Pickard from Dunkeswick, Yorkshire who had died by 1779.   Stanley was apprenticed to William Pickard on 25 January 1779.

Further research determined that Stanley had been born on 9 April 1760 and baptised on 7 May 1760 in All Saints Church, Harewood, Yorkshire to parents George and Mary from nearby Dunkeswick. George’s sister Catherine Pickard (1732-1793), is my six times great grandmother (1737-1775) and married Thomas Selby (1730-1818) on 24 November 1754 in Sherburn in Elmet, Yorkshire.

All Saints Church, Harewood – Tim Green / CC BY (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)

At the time of his burial in 1775, George (1737-1775) was described as a labourer from Dunkeswick. The 1848 Topographical Directory of England describes Dunkeswick as a township within the parish of Harewood in the West Riding of Yorkshire. In the late 18th century much of the lands were owned by the Lascelles family and the parish is well known for a significant property: Harewood House. Catherine’s brother William (1729-1807) was a tenant farmer in Dunkeswick on land owned by the Lascelles family.

It is unclear how Stanley came to be apprenticed to a master glover in London. While the master was called William Pickard, there does not seem to be a close connection between his father George and his master William. What does seem to be the case is that Stanley did not complete his apprenticeship. A record for his burial was found in the parish records of St Mary at Hill parish church near Billingsgate, London. It shows that he was buried on 31 August 1779 aged 19. No further information was included in the record. It seems that his apprenticeship was short lived.

I found a further record for his brother James (1763-1832) which showed that he did gain the freedom of the City of London on 3 April 1799, on payment of 46 shillings and 8 pence, after completing his apprenticeship with the Draper’s Livery Company. His father was also named as George Pickard from Dunkeswick, deceased. So far, I’ve been unable to find James’ apprenticeship record. Draper’s Hall does still exist in the City of London in Throgmorton Street.

I am interested in Stanley’s ancestors as I have limited information about them. Do contact me if you know more about the family.

Note: the map used in this blog has been reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the following creative commons licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ and sourced from the NLS maps site https://maps.nls.uk/.

Bibliography

Harewood Parish. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/topographical-dict/england/pp409-413 : accessed August 2020.

London Apprenticeship Records. https://www.findmypast.co.uk/ : accessed August 2020.

London Freedom of the City Admission papers. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/ : accessed August 2020.

OS Maps. https://maps.nls.uk/ : accessed August 2020.

St Mary at Hill Church. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/dictionary-of-london/mary-at-hill-mary-de-cricherche-chapel : accessed August 2020.

The Drapers Livery Company. https://www.thedrapers.co.uk/Company/History-And-Heritage.aspx : accessed August 2020.

The Worshipful Company of Glovers of London. https://www.thegloverscompany.org/index.php/history-of-the-company : accessed August 2020.

West Riding Land Tax Records. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/ : accessed August 2020.

Yorkshire baptisms, marriages and burials. https://www.findmypast.co.uk/ : accessed August 2020.

Searching for a landed gentry family in my ancestry

As a family historian I was hoping that at some point I would find a significant historical figure in my family. Early on in my research I came across a possible link into the Fairfax family who had risen to significance during the English Civil War. On further investigation it proved incorrect as there were two Henrie Arthington’s living in the old West Riding of Yorkshire during the 17th century. The first Henrie Arthington (1616/7-1681) was baptised on the 2 January 1616/7 in St John the Baptists Church in Adel; his parents were William and Ann Tancred. Arthington is also a place within the parish of Adel and Arthington Hall was the seat of the Arthington family from 13th to 18th century. Henrie married Mary Fairfax (1616-1678) in 1638; Mary’s father was Ferdinando Fairfax (1584-1648) who was on the side of the parliamentarians in the Civil War and was at Marston Moor. The second Henrie Arthington (1605-1656/7) was my 10th great grandfather and he was buried in Gargrave on 19 January 1656/7. Gargrave is near Skipton in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Henrie married Elizabeth Shaw and I am descended from their son William (1630-1670) – see the following chart.

Descendant Chart for Henrie Arthingtoncropped

Descendant chart for Henrie Arthington of Gargrave

I have a copy of the transcribed Gargrave Parish Records for the period 1558-1812 which include quite a lot of records for members of the Arthington family, some of which I’ve been unable to link to my own family. For example, the register records on 10 April 1637 an agreement that the vicar and churchwardens had come to over the pew rights of Richard Arthington and that “Henrie Currar is contented to suffer the said Richard Arthington to sitt in (the pew) during his natural life”. If anyone else has been able to link together more of these Arthington records then do please contact me.

Waterhousecoatofarms

Waterhouse family coat of arms

Turning then to another landed gentry family, the Waterhouses, it seems likely that there are connections between them and my ancestors. My first clue came when I eventually found the baptism for Bridget Waterhouse in the Braithwell parish register. Braithwell is in the West Riding of Yorkshire and Bridget had been baptised on 6 October 1635 with her father recorded as Charles, gent. Bridget married Thomas South (1629-1685) on 30 April 1655 in Braithwell and they are my 9th great grandparents.

 

StJamesChurchBraithwell

St James Church Braithwell ID 166756155 © Peter Shaw | Dreamstime.com

Bridget’s father Charles proved more difficult to find until I found a reference to Charles in the pedigree of the Waterhouse family of Braithwell (near Halifax) reproduced in Joseph Hunter’s history of South Yorkshire. Charles was one of Thomas Waterhouse and Dorothy Vincent’s younger sons and his baptism was recorded in 1580 in the Braithwell parish registers; the registers can be found on Family Search. Thomas and Dorothy had married in 1573 and the lands of the Vincent family at Braithwell passed to Dorothy, the daughter and heir of Thomas Vincent, and thus her husband Thomas Waterhouse. Very little information could be found for Charles, although he does seem to have received an inheritance when his father died. The estates at Braithwell went to his elder brother Vincent and were passed to his descendants.

OSYorks290date1854Braithwellannotated

OS map 1854 showing Micklebring and Moot Hall in the parish of Braithwell

Charles’s father Thomas (1547-1598) is descended from the Waterhouse family of Halifax whose pedigree is recorded in Foster’s Yorkshire families and can be traced back to Sir Gilbert Waterhouse (1275-1340). Thomas’s grandfather was Robert Waterhouse (1500-1581) of both Moot Hall and Shibden Hall which his wife Sibil’s (1500-1588) grandfather William Otes had owned. Shibden Hall dates from the early 15th century and was owned by the Savile and Waterhouse families before the Lister family. One of the Lister families descendants was Anne Lister, also known as ‘Gentleman Jack’.

Returning now to Bridget Waterhouse and her husband Thomas South, after their marriage they continued to live in Micklebring near Braithwell and had at least 10 children: eight boys and two girls. Three of their children died young and no marriages could be found for any of their siblings in the Braithwell parish register. It seems that some family members did marry in the nearby parish of Conisbrough. Thomas’s burial record in the Braithwell parish register records that an affidavit was sworn indicating that he had been buried in a woollen shroud. Thomas and Bridget’s son Samuel (1677/78-1729) is my 8th great grandfather. The family chart shows Thomas and Bridget and their children.

Descendant Chart for Thomas Southcropped

Descendant chart for Thomas South and Bridget Waterhouse

I am interested in knowing more about the South family as I have not been able to trace all of Thomas and Bridget’s children. Do contact me if you know more about them.

Note: the map used in this blog has been reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the following creative commons licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ and sourced from the NLS maps site https://maps.nls.uk/.

Bibliography:

Adel, West Riding of Yorkshire. https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Adel : accessed July 2020.

Braithwell, West Riding of Yorkshire. https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Braithwell : accessed July 2020.

Braithwell, West Riding of Yorkshire. https://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/place/11657 : accessed July 2020.

Burke’s Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. https://www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed July 2020.

Clay, John W. ed. (1895) Familiae Minorum Gentium. London: The Harleian Society. Vol III. pp. 844-850. https://archive.org/ : accessed July 2020.

Foster, Joseph. (1874) Pedigrees of the County Families of Yorkshire: West Riding. London: W Wilfred Head. Vol II. https://archive.org/ : accessed July 2020.

Hunter, Rev Joseph.  (1828) South Yorkshire. London: Hunter. Vol II pp. 130-135.

Gargrave, West Riding of Yorkshire. https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Gargrave : accessed July 2020.

OS Maps. https://maps.nls.uk/ : accessed July 2020.

Turner, J. Horsfall. (1883) Biographica Halifaxensis. Bingley: T Harrison. Vol I. pp. 274-276. https://archive.org/ : accessed July 2020.

Turner, J. Horsfall. (1911) The Coats of Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Yorkshire. Idle: John Wade. https://archive.org/ : accessed July 2020.

George Hamnette Bean (1864-1958)

I came across George while researching my Bean ancestors. In a family who often worked on the land or as domestic servants he stood out as someone with a different occupation. The 1891 census records him as a musician and I also found a record for him which described him as a bandsman on a ship. But before we get to that I would like to explain his relationship to me; George is my first cousin three times removed.

George was the third son of William Bean (b 1837) and Mary Askew (b 1832) and was baptised in the Chapel in Sowerby, Yorkshire on 10th July 1864. His father’s occupation was given as butler and their residence as Lower Brockwell. In the 1861 census George’s parents were both living in Sowerby but in different houses. William was a domestic servant in Mill House which was headed by William Henry Rawson, Deputy Lieutenant, Magistrate and woollen merchant. William’s wife Mary was living at nearby Stansfield Lodge with their first son Frederick Joshua Bean (1859-1869). In 1871 the family were at Brockwell house where William was the butler to the Rawson family (see annotated map). He was still a butler in 1881; George was then aged 15 and a wool teaser.

OSSowerby1894annotated

1894 OS Map showing Sowerby, Brock Well House and Mill House

George enlisted in 21st Hussars as a private in 1882, served in Dublin, Ireland and arrived in Colchester, Essex on 15 July 1887. He married his wife Harriet Ann Wroe (1864-1942) on 19 September 1887 in Colchester. George went with his regiment to India and his military records show that he arrived there on 21 December 1887. Within a year he was in hospital in Bangalore. George served in the East Indies for just over two years and was back home by 19 December 1889. His military record shows that he had completed seven years’ service, and that in 1889 he was transferred to the Army Reserve and discharged in 1894. Unfortunately, the record does not confirm his occupation at the end of his military service, just that he had been a wool teaser when he enlisted. It’s George’s WWI enlistment record for the 2nd East Lancashire Brigade in 1915 which gave his occupation as a musician. It does seem possible that George became a musician during his military service with the 21st Hussars.

George and Harriet’s first two daughter, Gladys (1890-1926) and Marjorie (1892-1976), were born in Sowerby. By the 1891 census the family were living in Redcar, North Yorkshire when George was described as a musician and their address was No. 2 Beach Cottage. Between 1891 and 1901 George and Harriet had four more children, Esme (1893-1893) born in Yorkshire, and then Esme (1895-1986), George Frederick (1897-1985) and Kenneth William (1900-1901) born in Lancashire. In 1901 the family were living at 6 Molyneux Street, Levenshulme, South Manchester, Lancashire. George’s occupation was recorded as “musician orchestral”.  A record for George in the 1911 census wasn’t found, but one for his wife Harriet was. She was living with four of their children at 26 Clare Road, Levenshulme. Harriet was described as an elementary school head teacher. It is possible that George was working away from home at the time of the 1911 census.

The next record I found for George was on the ship Oronsa’s crew list. His address was listed as 26 Clare Road and he had signed an agreement to board the ship on 11 July 1912 at 6am as a bandsman. His wages were £3 per month and he left the ship in Liverpool on 14 October 1912. The Oronsa was a steel hulled steam ship which had been built by Harland and Wolfe in Belfast in 1906. It was operated by the Pacific Steam Navigation Company on their Liverpool to Argentina route. During WW1 it what used as a cargo steamer; it was sunk by a U-Boat on 29 April 1918.

Oronsaship

Ship Oronsa

George re-enlisted in the army, the 2nd East Lancashire Brigade, in Manchester at the age of 50 on 16 March 1915. He was attached to the 2nd Reserve Battalion of the Royal Field Artillery as a gunner and served at “home” probably in the 190th Territorial Force Depot in Manchester. He was discharged from military service on 6 July 1917. His army pension papers include a note from 26 Clare St, Levenshulme, written on 15 February 1919, inquiring about his silver war badge which he later received.

George, Harriet and their four adult children left Levenshulme not long after WWI. George left London on 1 November 1919 and arrived in Melbourne, Australia on 12 December 1919 on the ship Orvieto; a cruise ship built in 1909 by Workman Clark, Belfast and owned by The Orient Company. The arrival of the ship was reported in a number of Australian newspapers as there were a number of returning soldiers and members of their families on it.

George and Harriet’s daughter Esme married Frank Unwin Simpson (1898-1964) on 11 December 1919. The witnesses to her marriage were her sister Marjorie and brother George. Her husband Frank left for Melbourne, Australia shortly after their wedding.

Harriet, their son George Frederick, his wife Louisa Durden (1901-1984), and daughters Gladys, Marjorie and Esme followed George and Frank to Australia. They left London for Melbourne on 17 June 1920 on the ship Beltana run by the P&O Branch Line Service and they all travelled third class.

It seems from electoral roll records that George, Harriet, their children and partners settled near Melbourne. Some of the family are buried in Box Hill Cemetery. Their son George and his wife Louisa are both buried in Drouin Cemetery in the shire of Baw Baw. Drouin is about 90 kilometres east of Melbourne.

I am interested in knowing more about what the Bean family did in Australia as I know very little about their lives there. Do contact me if you know more about them.

Note: the map used in this blog has been reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the following creative commons licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ and sourced from the NLS maps site https://maps.nls.uk/.

Bibliography:

Australia Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980. https://www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed June 2020.

Australia newspapers. https://trove.nla.gov.au/ : accessed June 2020.

British Army Service Records 1760-1915. https://www.findmypast.co.uk : accessed June 2020.

British Army Service Records 1914-1920. https://www.findmypast.co.uk : accessed June 2020.

British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920. https://www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed June 2020.

Brockwell. https://www.calderdale.gov.uk/wtw/search/controlservlet?PageId=Detail&DocId=101852 : accessed June 2020.

Liverpool, England, crew lists, 1861-1919. https://www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed June 2020.

Oronsa. https://uboatproject.wales/wrecks/oronsa/ : accessed June 2020.

Orvieto passenger ship http://passengersinhistory.sa.gov.au/node/933273 : accessed June 2020.

OS Maps. https://maps.nls.uk/ : accessed June 2020.

Sowerby. https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Halifax/SowerbyHistory : accessed June 2020.

Territorial Force Depots. https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/other-aspects-of-order-of-battle/territorial-force-depots/ : accessed June 2020.

UK, Silver War Badge Records, 1914-1920. https://www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed June 2020.

World War One British Army Pension Records 1914-1920. https://www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed June 2020.

Emily Bristow (1877-1954)

While I was researching members of the Bean family, I came across Emily the daughter of William Bristow (1838-1908) and Jane Bean (1850-1922). Emily is my first cousin three times removed. She was the daughter of a farmer and the family were living in New Grange, Airmyn, Yorkshire in the 1891 census. The village is sited where the rivers Aire and Ouse meet and is less than two miles from Goole.

Emily married Goldthorpe Brunyee (1879-1919), the son of local landowner William Brunyee (1853-1917), in St David’s Church, Airmyn on 27 November 1900. At the time of their marriage Goldthorpe was living in Booth Ferry House and Emily at Airmyn Grange which, her parents had moved to by then. Goldthorpe was named after his mother Martha Goldthorpe (1856-1904).

OSBoothFerryHouse1907

OS Map 1907 showing Booth Ferry House

According to the recently published Oxford Dictionary of Family Names, the surname Brunyee is a nickname from the Middle English brun/brown and eye. There were 86 Brunyee’s recorded in the 1881 census; they lived mostly in the West Riding of Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. One of them wad Goldthorpe’s father William (1853-1917) who continued to live in Booth Ferry House, Airmyn near Goole until his death aged 63. William was badly burned in a fire in his house and was found by Richard Brown, a groom. The report of his inquest stated that he occupied farms at Goole Fields, Ousefleet and Howden. The jury’s verdict was that he had died of shock as a result of “burns accidentally received”. Although William died intestate the main beneficiary was his son Goldthorpe.

Returning to Emily and her husband Goldthorpe, they had at least six children as the chart at the top of this page shows. By 1911 the family were living at Goole Fields with Goldthorpe described as a farm bailiff. They had two servants and five wagoners.

OSGooleFields1907

OS Map 1907 showing Goole Fields 

Goldthorpe’s death in 1919, aged 39, was also reported in the newspapers. He was described as a prominent agriculturist living a Goole Fields and that he had died after a short illness. In 1939 his wife Emily was living at Brunthorpe, Airmyn Road, Goole with two of her daughters and their families. She was still living there when she died in 1955.

I am interested in the Brunyee family as I have limited information about them. Do contact me if you know more about them.

 

 

Note: all maps used in this blog have been reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the following creative commons licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ and sourced from the NLS maps site https://maps.nls.uk/.

Bibliography:

Airmyn. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airmyn : accessed 18 June 2020.

FindmyPast. Collection: British Newspapers, 1710-1965. https://findmypast.co.uk : accessed 18 June 2020.

Hanks et al. (2016) The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

OS Maps. https://maps.nls.uk/ : accessed 19 June 2020.

University of Portsmouth, History of Airmyn, in East riding of Yorkshire and West Riding | Map and description, A Vision of Britain through Time. http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/place/11102 : accessed 19 June 2020.

Bean family

I was discussing family history with a friend a little while ago; she had decided to complete the research of her eight great grandparents. I realised that in the case of one of my own great grandmothers, Sarah Ann Haw’s (1874-1944), I knew very little about her mother Ann Bean (1843-1911). This blog post is about Ann, her parents Joshua Bean (1809-1876) and Ann Smith (1808-1875) from Claxton and her seven siblings: four brothers and three sisters.The pedigree chart shown above for Ann includes her parents Joshua and Ann, and then traces the family back three further generations who were all living in this part of the North Riding of Yorkshire.

ClaxtonmapfromVofBcircled

Parish of Bossall – see bibliography for reference

The Bean family came from Claxton in the North riding of Yorkshire. In 1870 it was described as a township within the parish of Bossall 9 miles North East North from York. Bossall is no longer a substantial village. This map from the Vision of Britain website has been annotated to show the approximate area of the parish of Bossall.

 

 

Joshua and Ann had eight children and continued to live in Claxton until their deaths. Joshua was recorded in different censuses as a gardener in 1841, farmer in 1851 and carrier in 1871. When he died his will was proved by his eldest son, John Bean (1836-1925), my third great uncle. By the time of his father’s death in 1876 John, a gamekeeper, was living in Hack Green, near Baddington, Cheshire. One of his sons, George Wetherhill Bean (1877-1915), also became a gamekeeper and died on 14 March 1915 in Hack Green. His death at the age of 37 was reported in the Nantwich Guardian. It included details of his employment; before his “protracted illness” he had been head gamekeeper to Mr Frank Barlow of Gestryn Colyn Hall, North Wales. When his father John died in 1925 there was also a report in a local paper, although this time it was in the Cheshire Observer. John was described as a “popular South Cheshire gamekeeper” and that he had been gamekeeper to Mr Bailey of Manchester who had had shooting rights on the estate of Mr Shaw of Hack Green. Hack Green is now more commonly known for its secret nuclear bunker.

BromptonCemetery

Brompton Cemetery ID 92209686 © Ken Taylor | Dreamstime.com

Joshua and Ann’s next three children were sons. William was born in 1837. He left Yorkshire and in 1911 was living in Blackpool, Lancashire when he was described as a Gentleman butler. He was followed by George (1839-1920) who in 1891 was described as a land steward. He had spent time outside the UK as two of his children were born in Montreal, Canada. At the time of his death he was living with one of his sons in Parsons Green, Fulham and was buried in Brompton Cemetery.

 

Their fourth son was James (1841-1898) who remained in Claxton. In 1891 he was described as a farmer and carrier. It is possible that he had carried on his father’s business after his death.

St._Mary's_Church,_Sand_Hutton_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1801565

St Mary’s Church, Sand Hutton

Joshua and Ann had four daughters. Their eldest daughter was my great grandmother Ann (1843-1911) who was baptised on 9 April 1843 in Bossall, Joshua’s occupation was recorded as a gardener. Ann married my two times great grandfather William Haw (1846-1907) in St Mary’s Church in the nearby village of Sand Hutton on 26 May 1870. William was a tailor from York and the marriage was witnessed by two of Ann’s brothers: John and James. After their marriage they lived in York where William continued to work as a tailor. In 1901 they were living at 45 Marygate in Bootham; it runs from Clifton to the River Ouse alongside the historic St Mary’s Abbey and the museum gardens.

Joshua and Ann had three more daughters. Sarah Elizabeth (1844-1921) married George Thornton (1845-1929) on 9 September 1875 in St Mary’s Church, Sand Hutton. At the time of their marriage George was a machinist. By 1911 he had become a school caretaker and they were living in Alexandra Street, Goole.

Their next daughter was Jane Bean (1850-1922), who also married in St Mary’s Church, Sand Hutton. Her husband was William Bristow (1838-1908) a local farmer from Claxton. They married on 7 June 1875. By 1881 William was farming Glebe Farm, Kirk Smeaton which consisted of 126 acres and employing 3 boys. The family had moved to New Grange, Airmyn by 1891. William was still a farmer and the family had moved to within six miles of Wressle which is where William had been born. When William died in 1908, he was living at Airmyn Grange near Goole; probate was granted to his wife Jane. She continued to farm at Airmyn Grange with two of her daughters, Ann (1876-1946) and Edith (1880-1943), until at least 1911. She was still living there when she died in 1922.

Joshua and Ann’s youngest daughter was Margaret (1852-1905). She also married in St Mary’s Church, Sand Hutton. Her husband was John Robinson Bowling (1846-1929), a cordwainer. They married on 18 May 1869 and their witnesses were William Haw and Margaret’s sister Ann Bean. In 1901 Margaret and John were living in Stockton on the Forest and John was described as a shoemaker.

I am interested in Joshua’s ancestors as I have limited information about them. Do contact me if you know more about the family.

Bibliography:

Bossall. https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/NRY/Bossall : accessed 18 June 2020.

FindmyPast. Collection: British Newspapers, 1710-1965. https://findmypast.co.uk : accessed 18 June 2020.

Hack Green. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hack_Green_Secret_Nuclear_Bunker : accessed 18 June 2020.

Victoria county history https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/yorks/north/vol2/pp91-98 : accessed 17 June 2020.

University of Portsmouth, History of Claxton, in Ryedale and North Riding | Map and description, A Vision of Britain through Time. http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/place/12069 : accessed 17 June 2020.

Mary Weir/Wear 1850-1918

EaskeySligo

Easkey, Sligo, Ireland

Mary first appears in genealogical records in the 1851 census living in Long Close Lane in York (near Walmgate Bar).[1]  Her age was given as six months old suggesting she had been born about September/October 1850. She was listed on the census with her parents James (1784[2]-1857[3]) and Mary (1804-1865[4]), her six siblings and a visitor called Mary Carty. They had all been born in Ireland; a later census record for her sister Catherine gave her birth place as Easkey in County Sligo which provided a helpful clue to the family’s origins in Ireland. Mary had been born in York and is one of those ancestors whose birth and/or baptism records have yet been found. Unfortunately, the Catholic Church records for Easkey do not cover the period when her siblings were born and they too have been difficult to trace.

WalmgateBar

Walmgate Bar, York

 

 

What fascinated me about Mary was, that until I started researching my family, I had no idea that there was either Catholicism or Irish ancestors in it. As a child I lived very close to my great grandmother Violet Kate Richardson who was Mary and her husband Luke Richardson’s fifth child. I have already written about Luke so this blog post is focused on Mary’s immediate family. It is also linked to research I have been carrying out for my Masters dissertation into the Irish families who migrated to the civil parish of York St George (in Walmgate) in the mid-1800s.

 

 

My great grandmother, Violet, was in her nineties when she died. We used to visit her regularly and I don’t remember her ever talking about her family. What a missed opportunity to find out more about the lives of her grandparents, James and Mary Weir/Wear, and their family in Ireland. It would have been really interesting to know more about her three aunts and three uncles. The aunts have been easier to trace than the uncles which was something of a surprise. They were in order of age as follows:

Patrick (b 1824[5]) only appeared in the 1851 census with the family; his occupation was given as an agricultural labourer.[6] He also featured in the York Herald newspaper dated 15 February 1851,[7] which reported that he had been assaulted by the Kilmartin brothers in the nearby village of Dunnington. Patrick had been selling bags of chicory and received two black eyes from the brothers who were bound over to keep the peace. No further confirmed records for Patrick have been found.

Catherine (1826[8]-1913[9]) married her husband James Duffy (b 1830[10]) in the Catholic Chapel, Little Blake St, York on 14 December 1852. [11] They subsequently left York in search of work and had settled in Hartlepool by the 1871 census.[12]  Their son John (1853[13]-1934[14]) became a ship riveter and continued to live in County Durham.[15] Three of their daughters married. Catherine was recorded in the Hartlepool Union Workhouse in 1911 where she was described as married; there was no sign of her husband James.[16]

John (b 1834[17]), an agricultural labourer, only appeared in the 1851 census with his family in York. No further records for him have been found.

James (b 1836[18]) stayed in York long enough to marry Bridget Connelly (1835[19]-1903[20]) in the Catholic Chapel, Little Blake Street, York on 11 February 1859.[21] By then they were both living in the Bedern in York and James was described as a labourer.[22] Their daughter Mary was born on 8 March 1860 in the York Union Workhouse.[23] James does not appear with Bridget and Mary when they are recorded in the Workhouse in the 1861 census;[24] it is possible that he had abandoned his wife and child in York.

Susannah (1841[25]-1909[26]) proved difficult to trace as she was recorded as Judy in the 1851 census.[27] An article in the Yorkshire Gazette, dated 11 June 1859, about an alleged assault mentioned both her and her siblings.[28] She probably married George ABBEY (1841[29]-1910[30]) in 1861 in York.[31] They moved away from York and both their deaths were registered in Whitby, Yorkshire.

Ann (1843[32]-1890[33]) married Charles Rafter (1835[34]-1883[35]), a labourer, in St George’s Catholic Church in 1860.[36] They remained in York and Ann was the informant when her mother Mary died of phthisis on 24 March 1865.[37] By the 1881 census Charles recorded his occupation as a “teaser woollen”.[38] Their children were mostly either unskilled workers or working in the glassworks.[39] The exception to this was their son Thomas who joined the merchant navy and by 1939 was living in Hull, Yorkshire where he was working as a trawler engineer.[40]

mary-richardson-far-left-who-wouljd-have-thought-it-cottage

“Who Would Have Thought It”

Mary (1850[41]-1918[42]) married Luke Richardson (1846[43]-1891[44]), a Yorkshireman on 17 December 1868 in St George’s Catholic Church, York.[45] The family lived in “Who Would Have Thought It”, one of a row of cottages in the nearby village of Stillingfleet and Luke was a railway platelayer.[46]

 

 

I would like to discover more about Mary’s siblings and am looking forward to when county archives are able to open again. In the meantime, if you have any information about the family which you are willing to share with me, then do please contact me.

[1] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 30 March 1851. WEAR, Mary. PN HO107/2355. FL 375. SN 171.  ED 8b. p. 40. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[2] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 30 March 1851. WEAR, James [head]. PN HO107/2355. FL 375. SN 171.  ED 8b. p. 40. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[3] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 1st Q., 1857. WEIR, James. Vol. 9D. p. 20. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[4] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. York, Yorkshire. 24 March 1875. WEIR, Mary. Vol. 9D. p. 37. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[5] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 30 March 1851. WEAR, Patrick. PN HO107/2355. FL 375. SN 171.  ED 8b. p. 40. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020

[6] Ibid.

[7] York Herald. (1851) An Irish Row. York Herald. 15 February 1851. p. 6. Collection: 19th Century British Newspapers. http://www.findmypast.co.uk : accessed 14 March 2020.

[8] Census records. England. Middlesbrough, Yorkshire. 07 April 1861. DUFFY, Catherine. PN 3687. FL 16 SN 174.  ED 8. p. 30. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[9] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. RD: Hartlepool, Durham. 2nd Q., 1913. DUFFY, Catherine. Vol. 10A. p. 125. https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/Login.asp: accessed 14 March 2020.

[10] Census records. England. Hartlepool, Durham. 02 April 1871. DUFFY, James [head]. PN 4916. FL 92. SN 129. ED 19. p. 30. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[11] Marriages (PR) England. York, Yorkshire. 14 December 1852. DUFFY, James and WARE, Catherine. Certificate no: MXH752302.

[12] Census records. England. Hartlepool, Durham. 02 April 1871. DUFFY, James [head]. PN 4916. FL 92. SN 129. ED 19. p. 30. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[13] Births index (CR) England & Wales. RD: Wakefield, Yorkshire. 4th Q., 1853. DUFFY, John. Vol. 9C. p. 21. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[14] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. RD: Houghton, Durham. 1st Q., 1934. DUFFY, John. Vol. 10A. p. 592. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[15] Census records. England. Hartlepool, Durham. 02 April 1911. DUFFY, John [head]. RD 545. PN 29644. ED 44. SN 03. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[16] Census records. England. Throston, Durham. 02 April 1911. DUFFY, Catherine. RD 545. PN 29665. ED 65. SN 07. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[17] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 30 March 1851. WEAR, John. PN HO107/2355. FL 375. SN 171.  ED 8b. p. 40. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[18] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 30 March 1851. WEAR, James. PN HO107/2355. FL 375. SN 171.  ED 8b. p. 40. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[19] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 4th Q., 1903. WEAR, Bridget. Vol. 9D. p. 16. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[20] Ibid.

[21] Marriages (PR) England. York, Yorkshire. 11 February 1859. WARE, James and CONNELLY, Bridget. Certificate no: MXH822008.

[22] Ibid.

[23] Births index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 08 March 1860. WARE, Mary. Vol. 9D. p. 13. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[24] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 07 April 1861. WIER, Bridget. PN 3544. FL 111. SN 01. ED Workhouse. p. 04. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[25] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 30 March 1851. WEAR, Judy. PN HO107/2355. FL 375. SN 171.  ED 8b. p. 40. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[26] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. RD: Whitby, Yorkshire. 1st Q., 1909. ABBEY, Susannah.  Vol. 9D. p. 321. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[27] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 30 March 1851. WEAR, Judy. PN HO107/2355. FL 375. SN 171.  ED 8b. p. 40. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[28] Yorkshire Gazette. (1859) An Alleged Assault. Yorkshire Gazette. 11 June 1859. p. 4. Collection: 19th Century British Newspapers. http://www.findmypast.co.uk : accessed 14 March 2020.

[29] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. RD: Whitby, Yorkshire. 2nd Q., 1910. ABBEY, George. Vol. 9D. p. 271. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[30] Ibid.

[31] Marriages index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 3rd Q., 1861. ABBEY, George and WEAR, Susannah. Vol. 9D. p. 55. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[32] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 30 March 1851. WEAR, Ann. PN HO107/2355. FL 375. SN 171.  ED 8b. p. 40. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[33] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 1st Q., 1890. RAFTER, Ann. Vol. 9D. p. 37. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[34] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 4th Q., 1882. RAFTER, Charles. Vol. 9D. p. 25. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[35] Ibid.

[36] Marriages index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 3rd Q., 1860. RAFTER, Charles and WEIR, Ann. Vol. 9D. p. 87. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[37] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. York, Yorkshire. 24 March 1875. WEIR, Mary. Vol. 9D. p. 37. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[38] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 03 April 1881. RAFTER, Charles [head]. PN 4724. FL. 34. ED 15. p. 22. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[39] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 31 March 1901. RAFTER, William [head]. PN 4447. FL. 15. SN 141. ED 17. p. 22. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[40] 1939 Register. England. Hull, Yorkshire. 31 March 1901. RAFTER, Thomas [head]. 29 September 1939. Schedule 133. RG101/522-1/JAAT/131/1. National Archives (Great Britain), Kew, England. Collection: 1939 England & Wales Register.  https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[41] Census records. England. York, Yorkshire. 30 March 1851. WEAR, Mary. PN HO107/2355. FL 375. SN 171.  ED 8b. p. 40. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[42] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 2nd Q., 1918. RICHARDSON, Mary. Vol. 9D. p. 74. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[43] Births index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 2nd Q., 1846. RICHARDSON, Luke. Vol. 23. p. 756. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[44] Deaths index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 2nd Q., 1891. RICHARDSON, Luke. Vol. 9D. p. 65. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[45] Marriages index (CR) England & Wales. RD: York, Yorkshire. 4th Q., 1868. RICHARDSON, Luke and WEAR, Mary. Vol. 9D. p. 99. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

[46] Census records (CR) England. Stillingfleet05 April 1891. RICHARDSON, Luke [head].  PN 3896. FL 21. ED 2. p. 5. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/: accessed 14 March 2020.

James Scaling 1808-1877

Recently I write about two Haw brothers who married two sisters from the Goodrick family in my blog post called a tale of two brothers and two sisters. Further research into the Haw family revealed James Scaling who married two Haw sisters.

James was born in Scarborough, Yorkshire to parents Thomas and Alice and baptised on 2 August 1808.  When he married the first Haw sister, Ann, my fourth great aunt on 3 August 1831 in St Helens Church in York, he gave his residence as Manchester on the marriage licence they obtained. On their marriage record James was described as a glazier and a bachelor. Tracing the family using census records has however been problematic so I may not have identified all their children; it does look like though that they had at least three boys:

  • William Haw Scaling was baptised in Manchester Cathedral on 5 August 1832. He became a gilder, married and had at least three children.
  • John Scaling was born in 1839 and baptised in Manchester Cathedral on 21 August 1839. On his marriage record he gave his occupation as a brass pounder.
  • Thomas Scaling was born in Salford in 1841, became a plumber and married twice.

James’ occupation was given as a plumber and glazier living in Salford on his son William’s baptism record. An 1855 directory gave his occupation as a gas fitter and that he was living in 5 Bury Street, Salford. James’ wife Ann died on 21 March 1856 in Salford, Lancashire as evidenced by her probate record which also confirmed her address as Bury Street, Salford.  James then went on to marry Ann’s sister Hannah (1809-1884) on 27 March 1856 in Manchester. At the time this took place this was an unlawful marriage. It wasn’t until the Deceased Wife’s Sister’s Marriage Act of 1907 that this prohibition was removed. When Hannah’s first husband, Roger Arton (1806-1841), died he had left her with at least three children.

After their marriage James and Hannah lived in Trinity Lane, Micklegate, York where James continued to work as a journeyman plumber and glazier. They had moved to Dale Street by the time of the 1871 census and James died in York in 1877 aged about 69. Hannah died in 1884 aged 75 and was buried in nearby Market Weighton.

Note: the image is one I’ve taken of York City Walls.

Ancestors in Australia

So far in my family research I have found very few people who have emigrated to Australia from either my husband or my own part of our family tree. The most notable person was Thomas King, born about 1813, who was transported to Tasmania for stealing.

Recently I discovered some distant cousins, one of whom emigrated to Australia in 1928 and the other who joined him in 1949. The first to emigrate was Frederick William Ellis (1906-1957) who was born in Luton, Bedfordshire and by 1928 living in Cople in Bedfordshire. He left England for Australia on 13 October 1928 on the ship SS Orford where his occupation was given as farming. Information on the ship he travelled on is included on the Passengers in History website.

SSOrdfordfrompassengersinhistoryFrederick seems to have settled in Western Australia and so far I’ve been unable to determine if he received assistance for his passage. He wasn’t listed as a new settler arriving on the ship SS Orford in the list published in The Western Australian newspaper dated 10 November 1928.

 

Frederick was living in Northam, Western Australia when he enlisted in the Australian army in WWII. After the war his sister Helena (1904-1988) and brother-in-law Ashley Herbert Lansom (born 1906), my fifth cousin once removed, together with their two sons, emigrated to Australia on the ship SS Otranto. They left Tilbury Docks, London, England on 14 October 1949 bound for Freemantle in Western Australia. On the passenger list Ashley’s occupation was listed as a plumber and they gave their intended residence as c/o Ellis, 58 Hovea Crescent, Wundowie, Western Australia. The Lansom’s seem to have settled in a suburb of Perth called Dianella as they were recorded living there in The Government Gazette dated 31 August 1979.

A resource that I’ve found really helpful to add context to these two men is the National Library of Australia’s Trove website. It is free to use and is where I found copies of The Western Australia newspaper and The Government Gazette.

Note: the photo of SS Orford came from the Passengers in History website under their Creative Commons license. It has not been modified.

A tale of two brothers and two sisters

From time to time I come across intriguing connections between people in my ancestral family tree. This was certainly the case with two of my 2nd great uncles: John Charlton Haw (1876-1958) and Frederick Thomas Haw (1881-1858). Their parents, William Haw (1846-1907) and Ann Bean (1843-1911), my two times great grandparents, lived and worked in the York area of Yorkshire. William was a tailor who by the 1901 census was living with his family at 45 Marygate, York and working as a tailor on his own account.

John and Frederick were both living with their parents in 1901 with John described as a railway porter for the North Eastern Railway company and Frederick a labourer for them too. By the 1911 census Frederick had married Sarah Ethel Goodrick (born about 1881) and they had three children. His occupation was given as a municipal electric cable joiner. Sarah had been recorded as a servant to the Nutchey family in 1901; the head of the household was a railway clerk. By the 1939 register Frederick and Sarah were living at 23 Fifth Avenue, York and Frederick was an electrical engineer. He continued to live in York until his death in 1958 when his address was recorded as 23 Park Grove, York in St Thomas’ Church burial records. The church is located in nearby Lowther Street. I have found a possible death for Sarah in 1960.

Frederick’s brother John continued to work for the NER throughout his lifetime and in 1905 he joined the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants trade union which later became the National Union of Railwaymen. His occupation at that point was given as a shunter. In 1919 he married Maria Emily Goodrick (1880-1967) who was his brother Frederick’s wife Sarah’s younger sister. Before her marriage Maria had been a domestic servant for the Proctor family who ran a Chemical Fertiliser company and were Agricultural Merchants, living in Ashcroft, York. John and Emily continued to live in York and by 1939 were residing at 5 Neville Street with John giving his occupation as a railway foreman porter. Both John and Maria were still living there when John died. His burial record was found in St Thomas’s Church records.

Park Grove York

Park Grove, York

 

In addition, one of John and Fredericks’ sisters, Sarah Ann Haw (1874-1944), married my great grandfather William Ellis (1873-1951), and they were living at 40 Ambrose Street, York in 1939.  William’s father Francis Ellis (1839-1925) was residing with his family in 40 Park Grove, York in 1901, not far from where Frederick died in 1958 at no 23 Park Grove. (The photo Park Grove was taken recently by me and is an example of what the houses in the street now look like.)

 

 

As a final thought, it is interesting that both brothers died in 1958 and their burials recorded in St Thomas’s Church, York. They seem to have lived within half a mile of each other throughout their later lives.