Category Archives: Sarginson

Stanley Pickard (1760-1779) – a short life

Whilst researching my ancestors on the Sarginson side of my family I came across a record which intrigued me. Stanley, my first cousin seven times removed, seems to have been apprenticed to a member of the Glover’s Livery Company in London in 1779. The Company was one of the City’s ancient Livery Companies with a Hall which had been established in Beech Lane, Cripplegate in 1638. However, by the late 18th Century the number of members in the Company had decreased and the Hall was given up as there were limited funds to maintain it. Unfortunately, there is only a transcribed record of Stanley’s apprenticeship which states that he was the son of George Pickard from Dunkeswick, Yorkshire who had died by 1779.   Stanley was apprenticed to William Pickard on 25 January 1779.

Further research determined that Stanley had been born on 9 April 1760 and baptised on 7 May 1760 in All Saints Church, Harewood, Yorkshire to parents George and Mary from nearby Dunkeswick. George’s sister Catherine Pickard (1732-1793), is my six times great grandmother (1737-1775) and married Thomas Selby (1730-1818) on 24 November 1754 in Sherburn in Elmet, Yorkshire.

All Saints Church, Harewood – Tim Green / CC BY (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)

At the time of his burial in 1775, George (1737-1775) was described as a labourer from Dunkeswick. The 1848 Topographical Directory of England describes Dunkeswick as a township within the parish of Harewood in the West Riding of Yorkshire. In the late 18th century much of the lands were owned by the Lascelles family and the parish is well known for a significant property: Harewood House. Catherine’s brother William (1729-1807) was a tenant farmer in Dunkeswick on land owned by the Lascelles family.

It is unclear how Stanley came to be apprenticed to a master glover in London. While the master was called William Pickard, there does not seem to be a close connection between his father George and his master William. What does seem to be the case is that Stanley did not complete his apprenticeship. A record for his burial was found in the parish records of St Mary at Hill parish church near Billingsgate, London. It shows that he was buried on 31 August 1779 aged 19. No further information was included in the record. It seems that his apprenticeship was short lived.

I found a further record for his brother James (1763-1832) which showed that he did gain the freedom of the City of London on 3 April 1799, on payment of 46 shillings and 8 pence, after completing his apprenticeship with the Draper’s Livery Company. His father was also named as George Pickard from Dunkeswick, deceased. So far, I’ve been unable to find James’ apprenticeship record. Draper’s Hall does still exist in the City of London in Throgmorton Street.

I am interested in Stanley’s ancestors as I have limited information about them. Do contact me if you know more about the family.

Note: the map used in this blog has been reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the following creative commons licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ and sourced from the NLS maps site https://maps.nls.uk/.

Bibliography

Harewood Parish. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/topographical-dict/england/pp409-413 : accessed August 2020.

London Apprenticeship Records. https://www.findmypast.co.uk/ : accessed August 2020.

London Freedom of the City Admission papers. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/ : accessed August 2020.

OS Maps. https://maps.nls.uk/ : accessed August 2020.

St Mary at Hill Church. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/dictionary-of-london/mary-at-hill-mary-de-cricherche-chapel : accessed August 2020.

The Drapers Livery Company. https://www.thedrapers.co.uk/Company/History-And-Heritage.aspx : accessed August 2020.

The Worshipful Company of Glovers of London. https://www.thegloverscompany.org/index.php/history-of-the-company : accessed August 2020.

West Riding Land Tax Records. https://www.ancestry.co.uk/ : accessed August 2020.

Yorkshire baptisms, marriages and burials. https://www.findmypast.co.uk/ : accessed August 2020.

Searching for a landed gentry family in my ancestry

As a family historian I was hoping that at some point I would find a significant historical figure in my family. Early on in my research I came across a possible link into the Fairfax family who had risen to significance during the English Civil War. On further investigation it proved incorrect as there were two Henrie Arthington’s living in the old West Riding of Yorkshire during the 17th century. The first Henrie Arthington (1616/7-1681) was baptised on the 2 January 1616/7 in St John the Baptists Church in Adel; his parents were William and Ann Tancred. Arthington is also a place within the parish of Adel and Arthington Hall was the seat of the Arthington family from 13th to 18th century. Henrie married Mary Fairfax (1616-1678) in 1638; Mary’s father was Ferdinando Fairfax (1584-1648) who was on the side of the parliamentarians in the Civil War and was at Marston Moor. The second Henrie Arthington (1605-1656/7) was my 10th great grandfather and he was buried in Gargrave on 19 January 1656/7. Gargrave is near Skipton in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Henrie married Elizabeth Shaw and I am descended from their son William (1630-1670) – see the following chart.

Descendant Chart for Henrie Arthingtoncropped

Descendant chart for Henrie Arthington of Gargrave

I have a copy of the transcribed Gargrave Parish Records for the period 1558-1812 which include quite a lot of records for members of the Arthington family, some of which I’ve been unable to link to my own family. For example, the register records on 10 April 1637 an agreement that the vicar and churchwardens had come to over the pew rights of Richard Arthington and that “Henrie Currar is contented to suffer the said Richard Arthington to sitt in (the pew) during his natural life”. If anyone else has been able to link together more of these Arthington records then do please contact me.

Waterhousecoatofarms

Waterhouse family coat of arms

Turning then to another landed gentry family, the Waterhouses, it seems likely that there are connections between them and my ancestors. My first clue came when I eventually found the baptism for Bridget Waterhouse in the Braithwell parish register. Braithwell is in the West Riding of Yorkshire and Bridget had been baptised on 6 October 1635 with her father recorded as Charles, gent. Bridget married Thomas South (1629-1685) on 30 April 1655 in Braithwell and they are my 9th great grandparents.

 

StJamesChurchBraithwell

St James Church Braithwell ID 166756155 © Peter Shaw | Dreamstime.com

Bridget’s father Charles proved more difficult to find until I found a reference to Charles in the pedigree of the Waterhouse family of Braithwell (near Halifax) reproduced in Joseph Hunter’s history of South Yorkshire. Charles was one of Thomas Waterhouse and Dorothy Vincent’s younger sons and his baptism was recorded in 1580 in the Braithwell parish registers; the registers can be found on Family Search. Thomas and Dorothy had married in 1573 and the lands of the Vincent family at Braithwell passed to Dorothy, the daughter and heir of Thomas Vincent, and thus her husband Thomas Waterhouse. Very little information could be found for Charles, although he does seem to have received an inheritance when his father died. The estates at Braithwell went to his elder brother Vincent and were passed to his descendants.

OSYorks290date1854Braithwellannotated

OS map 1854 showing Micklebring and Moot Hall in the parish of Braithwell

Charles’s father Thomas (1547-1598) is descended from the Waterhouse family of Halifax whose pedigree is recorded in Foster’s Yorkshire families and can be traced back to Sir Gilbert Waterhouse (1275-1340). Thomas’s grandfather was Robert Waterhouse (1500-1581) of both Moot Hall and Shibden Hall which his wife Sibil’s (1500-1588) grandfather William Otes had owned. Shibden Hall dates from the early 15th century and was owned by the Savile and Waterhouse families before the Lister family. One of the Lister families descendants was Anne Lister, also known as ‘Gentleman Jack’.

Returning now to Bridget Waterhouse and her husband Thomas South, after their marriage they continued to live in Micklebring near Braithwell and had at least 10 children: eight boys and two girls. Three of their children died young and no marriages could be found for any of their siblings in the Braithwell parish register. It seems that some family members did marry in the nearby parish of Conisbrough. Thomas’s burial record in the Braithwell parish register records that an affidavit was sworn indicating that he had been buried in a woollen shroud. Thomas and Bridget’s son Samuel (1677/78-1729) is my 8th great grandfather. The family chart shows Thomas and Bridget and their children.

Descendant Chart for Thomas Southcropped

Descendant chart for Thomas South and Bridget Waterhouse

I am interested in knowing more about the South family as I have not been able to trace all of Thomas and Bridget’s children. Do contact me if you know more about them.

Note: the map used in this blog has been reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the following creative commons licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ and sourced from the NLS maps site https://maps.nls.uk/.

Bibliography:

Adel, West Riding of Yorkshire. https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Adel : accessed July 2020.

Braithwell, West Riding of Yorkshire. https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Braithwell : accessed July 2020.

Braithwell, West Riding of Yorkshire. https://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/place/11657 : accessed July 2020.

Burke’s Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. https://www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed July 2020.

Clay, John W. ed. (1895) Familiae Minorum Gentium. London: The Harleian Society. Vol III. pp. 844-850. https://archive.org/ : accessed July 2020.

Foster, Joseph. (1874) Pedigrees of the County Families of Yorkshire: West Riding. London: W Wilfred Head. Vol II. https://archive.org/ : accessed July 2020.

Hunter, Rev Joseph.  (1828) South Yorkshire. London: Hunter. Vol II pp. 130-135.

Gargrave, West Riding of Yorkshire. https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Gargrave : accessed July 2020.

OS Maps. https://maps.nls.uk/ : accessed July 2020.

Turner, J. Horsfall. (1883) Biographica Halifaxensis. Bingley: T Harrison. Vol I. pp. 274-276. https://archive.org/ : accessed July 2020.

Turner, J. Horsfall. (1911) The Coats of Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Yorkshire. Idle: John Wade. https://archive.org/ : accessed July 2020.

The unidentified John Sarginson

It was probably about a year ago when my brother Tim set me a family history challenge. He is interested in a specific name on the WW1 war memorial which resides in St Helen’s Churchyard in Escrick; the village we were born and brought up in. The man’s name was John Sarginson. Neither of my parents was able to shed any light on this man who shares the same surname as we do. Our uncle Taff, one of my father’s brothers, wasn’t able to help either when we asked him about him earlier this year. Mind you he didn’t know that one of his ancestors from a nearby village had served in World War One, survived and is included in one of the historical books about Riccall; the village which he lives in.

Anyway how hard can this be to identify someone who is currently unidentified I thought to myself. Well much harder than I’d anticipated is the short answer. I started with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website and found some John Sarginson’s who had not survived the war but, having carried out further research,  I don’t think it is any of them. Then I thought well perhaps he is in some of the other WW1 records: Ancestry, Imperial War Museum lives of the Great War, Findmypast and the National Archives at Kew. No luck there though.

Then I realised that there would probably have been some meetings to discuss the war memorial and discovered that some papers and meeting minutes had been lodged at the Hull history centre as part of the Forbes Adam collection. Perhaps this was going to be the eureka moment that we family historians crave. Yes you’ve guessed it, it wasn’t. A very interesting letter from Lady Wenlock written in 1921, just after the commemoration service for the war memorial, did reveal some of the local feeling around it and some of the the names which had been included on it. But no the papers didn’t provide any information about who was going to be included on the memorial. A separate sub-committee run by the Rector made those decisions; and so far it doesn’t look these papers still exist or are accessible.

So it was back to the drawing board. After extensive further research, including also looking at the other soldiers on the war memorial and who they served with, I am no further forward in identifying the unidentified John Sarginson. I am loathe to leave him as a mystery so have written to the local historian who wrote a book about Escrick to see if he can help.

If you know anything about this John then do please contact me. I have also posted this blog to my other genealogy website https://sarginsonfamily.com/.

Postscript: it looks like John may no longer be unidentified. He was probably Corporal John Sarginson of the West Yorkshire regiment. It would be good though to know more about his connection to Escrick as he wasn’t born there. If you have any further information do please get in touch.